1.8 Conclusion to the EU & the euro

1.8 Conclusion to the EU & the euro

There is a close correlation between people's economic situation and their political choices. In view of the rapidly deteriorating economic situation, the unresolved euro crisis in recent years and the newly-added migration crisis, the position of the established parties is unlikely to improve. European elections, more so than national elections, are always protest elections. The Socialists, in particular, who between 2004 and 2014 with José Manuel Barroso, held the Presidency of the European Commission, are facing a devastating defeat.

The dwindling shares are welding the established parties ever closer together. Instead of political competition, in Brussels, just as in Berlin, a grand coalition is working together that is supported by the EPP (incl. CDU and CSU), the S&D (incl. SPD), the ALDE (incl. FDP) and the Greens. They all differ politically when it comes down to the nitty-gritty. But they are held together by a powerful political linchpin called the euro. All these parties supported the great experiment of European Monetary Union in the 1990s. The great difficulties of this single currency, which have arisen in particular since the euro crisis, have only been postponed to the future by the assumption of debt by the ECB. They have not been resolved. Today, the established parties are trapped in this system and are doing everything they can to keep the euro alive. If the euro fails, the vision of an ever-closer EU will fail. If this EU fails, the old parties will fail.


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